Founder of Dacca

Naib-Nazim of Dhaka

The position of Naib-Nazim (Deputy Governor) was created to administer Dhaka Niabat since 1717. They were appointed by the Governors until Sirajuddaula, the last independent Governor of Bengal, lost control to the British in the Battle of Plassey in 1757. Here is a partial list of Naib-Nazims of Dhaka:

Khan Muhammad Ali Khan (1717),

Itisam Khan (1723 – 1726),

A son of Itisam Khan (1726 – 1727),

Mirza Lutfullah Tabrizi (a grandson-in-law of Murshid Quli Khan) (1728 – 1734),

Sarfaraz Khan 1734-1739,

Galib Ali Khan (1734-1738),

Murad Ali Khan (1738-1739),

Abdul Fattah Khan (1739-1740),

Nowazish Mohammad Khan (1740-1754),

Hossain Quli Khan (1740-1754),

Murad Dowlat (1754-1755),

Jasarat Khan (1755-1762 and again 1765-1778),

Mohammed Ali (1762-1762),

Mohammed Reza Khan (1763-1765),

Ghaziuddin Haider (1834 – 1843).

The office of Naib Nazim of Dhaka was officially abolished in 1843.

Founder of Dacca

‘He had grown up with me from youth and was one year my junior,’ wrote the Emperor Jehangir of Islam Khan. ‘He was a brave man, of most excellent disposition, and in every respect distinguished above his tribe and family. Up to this day he has never tasted any stimulants, and his fidelity to me was such that I honored him with the title of Earzand (son).” Such in his master’s eyes was the Founder of Dacca, the new Capital of all Bengal.

Nasir Shah

[From The EASTERN BENGAL DISTRICT GAZETTEERS, DACCA, Chapter 2: History]

In 1432 A.D., the dynasty of Ilyas Shah was restored in the person of Sultan Nasir-ud-din Abul Muzaffar Mahmud Shah who reigned till 1400 A.D. He restored to his throne Meng Soamwun,  the king of Arakan, who had been expelled by the Burmese in  1406, but only on condition that he should remain a vassal of  Bengal. The mosque of Binat Bibi at Naraindia in the city of  Dacca was ereeted during his reign, but otherwise there is little  known about this prince.

 

Raja Kans and his descendants

[From The EASTERN BENGAL DISTRICT GAZETTEERS, DACCA, Chapter 2: History]

In 1405 there was a brief recrudescence of Hindu sovereignty, the throne of Bengal being seized by Raja Kans who reigned till 1414 A.D. His son and successor Jalal-ud-din was, as his name implies, a convert to the Muhammadan religion. He was followed by his son Ahmad Shah to whose reign belongs the oldest inscription yet found in the district. It is to be seen in the mosque of the saint Shah Langar at Muazzampur.

Ghiyas-ud-din

[From The EASTERN BENGAL DISTRICT GAZETTEERS, DACCA, Chapter 2: History]

Ghiyas-ud-din held his court at Sonargaon. He was a man of some literary attainments and invited the celebrated poet Hafiz to visit him. At the same time he was an able and enlightened ruler. We learn from Chinese sources that he despatched embassies to China and received presents in return. He died in 1373 A.D. and the remains of his tomb are still to be seen in Mahalla Baghalpur at Sonargaon. At the present day it is in a very dilapidated condition but it was described by Dr. Wise in  1874 in the following terms:— (more…)

INTRODUCTION TO THE EARLY HISTORY AND GROWTH OF CALCUTTA

BY RAJA BINAYA KRISHNA DEB

CALCUTTA, as it is today, may truly be called a great and magnificent city. Its metamorphosis from a small collection of villages in the midst of a swampy land has been characterized as unprecedented. Hardly any comparison can he instituted between its present state and its early condition. A scene quite novel and events quite unique in their character will he presented to our view. History furnishes but few parallels to a change so rapid, so varied, so extensive. The growth and development of Calcutta has been even more striking than that of St. Petersburg since the days of Peter the Great. With the (more…)

Calcutta was not founded by Briton

The High Court in Calcutta ruled last week that Charnock – widely held to have founded Calcutta as a young man with the British East India Company in 1690 – should be struck from school textbooks, official documents and websites.

The judges decreed that no one person could be credited with founding the city, which for nearly 250 years was the chief city in Britain’s overseas empire. Calcutta had grown up from rural settlements, a process that began before Charnock set up camp on the swampy banks of the Hooghly river at a village known as Kalikata on August 24, 1690. “Calcutta does not have a ‘birthday’,” the court said.

Calcutta was not founded by Briton, court rules by By David Orr in Delhi

Sikandar Shah

[From The EASTERN BENGAL DISTRICT GAZETTEERS, DACCA, Chapter 2: History]

Ilyas died in 1359 A.D. and was succeeded by his son Sikandar Shah in whose reign the emperor Feroz again invaded Bengal. Hearing of the Imperial advance Sikaudar, like his father, fled “into the islands of Ekdala.” Another siege ensued during which one of the chief towers of the fort fell owing to the pressure of the people upon it, but the fort being built of mud was speedily repaired. Negotiations for peace were opened and presents were (more…)

Dynasty Haji ilyas

[From The EASTERN BENGAL DISTRICT GAZETTEERS, DACCA, Chapter 2: History]

In 1352 A.D. Haji Ilyas conquered Eastern Bengal and founded a dynasty which continued with a brief interval to reign over that province for nearly a century and a half. In 1354, he was attacked by the Emperor Feroz Shah and fled to the fort of Ekdala. It is said that during the siege of the fort the saint Shaikh Raja Biyabani died, and Ilyas, coming out of the fort disguised as a mendicant, joined the Shaikh’s funeral procession and afterwards went to see the Emperor without himself being recognized.

Fakhrud-din

[From The EASTERN BENGAL DISTRICT GAZETTEERS, DACCA, Chapter 2: History]

Tatar Khan was succeeded in 1338 A.D. by his armourbearer Fakhr-ud-din who declared himself to be independent. He was, however, defeated by Qadir Khan who occupied Sonargaon where he amassed great treasure. This treasure proved his destruction for his soldiers went over to Fakhr-ud-din who offered them this immense reward as the price of their treachery, coins minted by this chief prove that he reigned ten years, when he met  (more…)

Bahadur Khan

[From The EASTERN BENGAL DISTRICT GAZETTEERS, DACCA, Chapter 2: History]

Subsequently the Emperor Ala-ud-din, finding that the viceroy of Bengal luid become too powerful, effected a partition of the province and appointed Bahadur Khan to he governor of Eastern Bengal with his head quarters at Sonargaon. A Bengali historian of Sonargaon tells us that after capturing the main forts and subduing the Raja of the (more…)