Further opposition to Mughals

Naib-Nazim of Dhaka

The position of Naib-Nazim (Deputy Governor) was created to administer Dhaka Niabat since 1717. They were appointed by the Governors until Sirajuddaula, the last independent Governor of Bengal, lost control to the British in the Battle of Plassey in 1757. Here is a partial list of Naib-Nazims of Dhaka:

Khan Muhammad Ali Khan (1717),

Itisam Khan (1723 – 1726),

A son of Itisam Khan (1726 – 1727),

Mirza Lutfullah Tabrizi (a grandson-in-law of Murshid Quli Khan) (1728 – 1734),

Sarfaraz Khan 1734-1739,

Galib Ali Khan (1734-1738),

Murad Ali Khan (1738-1739),

Abdul Fattah Khan (1739-1740),

Nowazish Mohammad Khan (1740-1754),

Hossain Quli Khan (1740-1754),

Murad Dowlat (1754-1755),

Jasarat Khan (1755-1762 and again 1765-1778),

Mohammed Ali (1762-1762),

Mohammed Reza Khan (1763-1765),

Ghaziuddin Haider (1834 – 1843).

The office of Naib Nazim of Dhaka was officially abolished in 1843.

Further opposition to Mughals

Resistance to the imperial arms did not, however, terminate with the submission of Isa Khan. The Afghans under Osman Lohani held out obstinately at Dhamrai and defeated the ‘thanadar’ while the king of Arakan laid siege to a fort near Sonargaon. The zamindar of Bikrampur assisted him by making a diversion in the south of the district and attacking Srinagar but Man Singh put both of them to flight with heavy loss.

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Isa Khan

The greatest of all the Bhuiyas was Isa Khan, son of a Bhis Rajput of Oudh who had accepted the Muhammadan faith. His principal strongholds were at Khizrpur, about a mile north of Narayanganj, and at Diwan Bagh, and he formed a rallying point for the Afghans (more…)

The twelve Bhuiyan

It was some years, however, before the whole of Bengal was actually reduced to subjection. Several tracts continued to be under the rule of petty chiefs who refused to own allegiance to the Emperor and gave shelter and a hearty welcome to the numerous Afghans whom Daud’s death had thrown out of employment. Foremost among those chiefs were the (more…)

On the Sena Rajas of Bengal, III

By Babu Rajendralala Mitra

Transcript and Translation of an Inscription from RdjashdM. — By C. T. Metcalfe, Esq., C. S.

——–

Victory be to the mouths of Shambhu (Shiva), who laughed on looking through the light of the moon at the shame-contracted face of Debi who, for fear of the removal of her breast (more…)

On the Sena Rajas of Bengal, II

By Babu Rajendralala Mitra

The reigns of Madhava and Kesava Sena were short and inconsequen- tial, and it is very likely that the Lakhmaniya who succeeded Kesava, and reigned in Bengal for 80 years, was taken by the Mahomedans to be the immediate successor of Lakshmana, son of (more…)

On the Sena Rajas of Bengal, I

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, VOL XXXIV, PART I, No III, 1865. EDITED BY THE PHILOLOGICAL SECEETAEY, CALCUTTA: PRINTED AT THE BAPTIST MISSION PRESS, 1866
By Babu Rajendralala Mitra

(more…)

Adminiatration of Sher Shah

Before proceeding to describe Dacca under the Mughals it will be convenient to record here a few of the facts relating to the period intervening between the defeat of Mahmud Shah and the final annexation of Bengal by Akbar in 1576.

Sher Shah appointed one Khizr Khan Bairak to be governor of Bengal but he married a daughter of Mahmud Shah and declared himself independent. For this he was imprisoned (more…)

EARLY HISTORY OF CALCUTTA

It is only two hundred and twenty years or so that Calcutta has come within the range of history. Its career of progress dates from that time. In 1752 Mr. Holwell, on assuming the office of Zamindar, was much exasperated in not finding any documents, papers, etc., prior to 1737 AD It is said that the great cyclone and inundation of 1738 destroyed important and valuable documents, and that the white-ants also ate up and damaged (more…)

Husain Shah

[From The EASTERN BENGAL DISTRICT GAZETTEERS, DACCA, Chapter 2: History]

The records of his immediate successors are equally meagre but in 1494, Shah Ala-ud-din Hasain Sharif Maki, known as Husain Shah the Good, came to the throne. He made his capital at Ekdala and captured Kamatapur in 1498 leaving his son Danyal as governor there. The young prince and his followers were however killed and a subsequent expedition sent into Assam was completely routed by the Ahoms. Husain Shah also sent (more…)

Battle of Plassey

The Battle of Plassey was a decisive victory of the British East India Company over the Nawab of Bengal and his French allies on 23 June 1757.